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Posted by on Feb 10, 2017 in Current Events, Local, Marketing, Real Life | 0 comments

Guess that Coworking space

Guess that Coworking space

Names and locations redacted to protect the innocent. I was in another city yesterday, scouting a place to hold a meetup.

Coworking space number 1: Delightfully pretentious little coffee shop with coworking space adjacent. Craft beer is also served. Seems to have a little Reformed Christian vibe going, because those Christians can drink beer with the window shades up, but unfortunately doesn’t seem to have a single room/meeting space that could hold 10 people without some of them having to sit in a hammock or something.

I walked upstairs to what I hoped was a better meeting space, only to find myself more or less awkwardly in the middle of someone else’s stand-up, in a room barely large enough to shoot a self-conscious CCM music video in.

Coworking space number 2: After walking in the front door of the building only to find myself in something that might have been a women’s clothing boutique or a used bookstore, or both, I asked where the coworking space was and was directed by the attractive young woman in the bodysuit to go to the side entrance.

My overwhelming thought on meeting her was to resist taking her hand and running, not because she was an attractive young woman in a bodysuit, but because the neighborhood is roughly that of the Bronx in the 1980s. I mean, I literally had to think hard about exiting my car when I got in the parking lot.

After finding the correct entrance, I met up with a receptionist whose overwhelming thought seemed to be to resist coming right out and asking if I voted for Trump (I didn’t). She reluctantly showed me a meeting room, which would actually work fine for our purposes, if any of our attendees survived getting mugged in the parking lot. She informed me, however, that they generally close at 6 pm.

For extra effect, a police SUV came up behind me while I was stopped at an intersection and lit off their sirens and lights because they needed to get around me. Not, as I initially assumed, to get to a shooting, but to a fender-bender a block over.

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Posted by on Oct 1, 2015 in Gadgetry, Internet Geekdom, Marketing, Technology | 0 comments

iPhone 6S+, or, iPad Micro

iPhone 6S+, or, iPad Micro

Not sure what to call it – phone or phablet? But it’s going to have to go just about wherever I go for the next 2 years, at least…

Pictured here: my outgoing iPhone 5 (early 2013 vintage) and new iPhone 6S+, both entombed in Otterbox Defender cases. My iPad is shown for an additional reference point.

IMG_0007

Here’s my frame of reference for a phone this size. I’m a bari sax player. When you scale something up this much, in the picture, it seems like just a bigger version of the same thing, but it’s not, exactly. Watch this extremely random video of two talented young saxophonists and maybe you’ll see what I mean.

So how is this working out for you? I can (sorta) hear you asking:

iphone-screen-size-comparison-v1.1.0-837x627

used with permission – mycleveragency.com

  • This phone (which does sport a reachability feature in deference to its extreme height, to which I hope they add an ability to contract left/right) is hard to use one-handed. That’s a tradeoff I decided to accept; as I get out and about and actually try to use it I’ll have to see what it’s like wearing it, using it, etc. As a frame of reference I’m 6 feet tall, built kinda large, wear gloves in the M/L size, and can comfortably play a bari sax. There are those for whom the 6S, not the 6S+, is definitely going to be the upper limit. There is actually a shoulder carry option for it (this company also makes them for other phones, and… this may be a little nuts, but to each their own). Here’s a significant dimension for you – the length of the 6S+ equals the width of the iPad…
  • It’s going to change how you use it. Again the bari sax analogy – it’s not just a big alto. It plays a different role and has different strengths and weaknesses. I decided to try it (the phone, not the bari sax) because in my current job I have fewer voice calls to make, I sit at a desk more, but when I’m away from the office I am more likely to absolutely need to get on an email. I’m going to need to use bluetooth more. It’s going to tempt me to get some kind of smart watch (pretty sneaky, Apple!). On the plus side, I will have more occasions when I can leave the iPad behind.
  • And about that iPad – the first time I ever saw a cellular-enabled iPad I thought – someone is going to use that thing for a phone. I think we’re reaching that convergence.
  • Another brilliant idea on convergence – the cell phone paradigm has been one device per phone number/SIM. With the increasing digitalization of the cell phone world, it would seem that the next step would be the ability to have a secondary phone. Maybe a simple feature phone that can share the number when all you need is – a phone.
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Posted by on Jul 11, 2015 in Real Life | 0 comments

It’s so peaceful in the country

It’s so peaceful in the country

TJ (owner of my client Jamersan) has let me use an RV that’s out on his property in Lee County, and I’ve been here a few days doing some work for him and also attending parts of the Auburn Knights Reunion.

I’ve never been much for camping, but that’s okay – staying in an RV that’s permanently connected to electricity and water doesn’t really feel like camping. Except the part about utter and complete quiet.

I do not sleep well in motel rooms. Someone is always banging doors, and there is the 2 a.m. wakey-wakey when the drunks come back from the bars, and then there is the 5:30 a.m. moment when (assuming you don’t have to get up by then anyway), these same people have to go to their road construction job. If Alabama let the bars stay open longer, I don’t think the motel industry would make it.

But back to the RV – I suggested it was utter and complete quiet, but that’s not exactly right. There are humming and buzzing insects, chirping birds, and the occasional train that I seem to have learned to filter out if I’m asleep. But what there isn’t:

  • people yelling down hallways, not in anger but because they just need to talk to someone who’s 50 feet away
  • traffic noise
  • someone else’s music being played, and not at a reasonable volume either

When I was playing more with the Montgomery Symphony – Maestro Tom Hinds would talk about how loud the modern world is compared to the pre-industrialized one. I’m not sure cities have ever been that quiet, but I can appreciate how people who lived on farms did enjoy more moments of actual quiet.

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